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Other Things To Do While We Can't Fly

Halibut

First Solo Pilot
#1
OK, how about Dwile Flonking?
(And don't pretend you've never heard of it!)
A mate says it's a waste of good beer. So I've suggested we use Greene King IPA. Discuss?
 

Halibut

First Solo Pilot
#5
mmmmmmm Beer! I would brew more, but I don't have enough empty bottles or kegs.... although there is a solution to that :ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO:
Dry January seems to have melted away rather quickly. There was a bloke quoted today who said he'd got it down to a personal best: finished by January the 6th.

Meanwhile, I'm already planning for Febrewery!
 

Halibut

First Solo Pilot
#8
Excellent :) What are you planning to brew?
I'm a newb at it, so another Woodforde's Wherry kit will have to do for the moment. The last batch I did is still in the barrel, but it's a bit too sweet and insipid, so I must have cocked it up again. I have a 50% success rate at the moment.
Do you think FEBREWERY could become a thing, or would it be seen as too antisocial? I kinda like the charity potential, though; when it's too cold to do long walks or runs, you could simply stay in and get sponsored to down pints.
 

Mike Calvert

Moderator
Staff member
#9
What temperature are you fermenting it at Halibut? Yeasties don't like getting too cold - they go dormant - or too warm - off flavours at best, dead yeast at worst - so if the temp drops too low overnight they can go dormant and then wake up again once it gets warm enough - say 25c

In a small fermenter I used a well sanitised aquarium heater set to 20c that sat in the fermenter and was able to keep it at a nice steady temp, especially overnight when the house is quite cold.
 

Halibut

First Solo Pilot
#10
Mustard Mitt I let it get cold this time around. So maybe it'll have a late spirt when the weather warms up. The heater is a good idea. Do I need to keep it at 25C? I don't think it ever gets that hot in this house - even in mid-Summer
 
#11
My two top tips for kits like Woodford Wherry are
- make sure it's a recently filled kit and not near its use by date (they degrade slowly in the tin)
- use bottled spring water, not tap water (the chemicals used to purify tap water cause funny off flavours)
 

Halibut

First Solo Pilot
#12
How do they flavour the malt to get it to taste like Wherry, do you think? They must add something, but I have no idea what. Doesn't say on the box.
 
#13
Lots of beer kits are made by a company called Muntons. Including the Woodford ones.
https://www.muntons.com/
I don't think they put anything magic or secret in - just the same malts and hops that Woodford use themselves. Like I said, the water is important and the yeasts that come with kits should be thrown away and replaced with a decent yeast from your local home brew shop.
I find this is really good:
https://www.thehomebrewforum.co.uk/
I prefer to bottle my beer rather than use barrels, but it's very much a personal thing.
 

Halibut

First Solo Pilot
#14
Lots of beer kits are made by a company called Muntons. Including the Woodford ones.
https://www.muntons.com/
I don't think they put anything magic or secret in - just the same malts and hops that Woodford use themselves. Like I said, the water is important and the yeasts that come with kits should be thrown away and replaced with a decent yeast from your local home brew shop.
I find this is really good:
https://www.thehomebrewforum.co.uk/
I prefer to bottle my beer rather than use barrels, but it's very much a personal thing.
Thanks, Martin. Do you have a favourite kit?
 

Halibut

First Solo Pilot
#15
How about a Forum Member competition for this year? Not sure what the challenge would be.
How about Pilot To Reach The Greatest Altitude, or some such?
 

Mike Calvert

Moderator
Staff member
#19
been tempted, but to do it properly requires distillation, and that's unfortunately not legal for the home brewer.

To make gin you take your 60% proof base spirit, mascerate the botanicals (i.e. soak them in the spirit) overnight, then distill that.
 

Halibut

First Solo Pilot
#20
been tempted, but to do it properly requires distillation, and that's unfortunately not legal for the home brewer.

To make gin you take your 60% proof base spirit, mascerate the botanicals (i.e. soak them in the spirit) overnight, then distill that.
How do you know which is the methanol and which is the ethanol?
 

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