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Beautiful day for flying... Oh...

#1
Yep, one of those lovely quiet cloudless wintery (but not too cold) days today in East Anglia. Perfect for a trundle along the coast or popping down to Priory Farm for a coffee and a chinwag.
It's torture thinking about it...
 

ginge

First Solo Pilot
#2
There you go, you had to go and mention Priory Farm. I have been looking at the nice flying day here as well and you have to go and mention one of my favourite drop ins, and I'm not talking about one of my lesser landings. Aah well that's life at the moment.
 

Dave Morton

Student Pilot
#3
There were plenty of aircraft maintenance and essential currency flights in Notts, especially in the GA sector, reckon my engine will need maintenance this week..
 

ginge

First Solo Pilot
#4
Almost the only thing we see flying here are the twin engine training flight for comercial licenses plus police and ambulance choppers. Situated where we are almost surrounded by the big London airports it is weird to see the almost empty skies, even very few vapour trails.
Meantime our aircraft is stuck in Hampshire awaiting the end of lockdown, can't even go and polish it.
 
#6
I’m losing track: when lockdown ends, if you’re in Tier 2, can you go flying with another person?
I'd humbly suggest we wait until we can read the actual regulations and guidance on the .gov website rather than relying on the news and social media with their rewording and (mis)interpretation.

That said, I hope so; though some of us might be best to wait until we've had a vaccination.
 
#7
The actual regulations that will apply from 2nd December (apart from Christmas) are here
https://www.gov.uk/guidance/local-restriction-tiers-what-you-need-to-know
I think they mean yes as long as you wear face coverings and take care with other precautions.. You have to follow some of the links to dig deeper into the guidance to get all of the picture.
And note that being in tier 2 before lockdown doesn't necessarily mean that you will be in tier 2 after 2nd December. They've said they will tell us about that on Thursday.
 
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Halibut

Student Pilot
#8
The actual regulations that will apply from 2nd December (apart from Christmas) are here
https://www.gov.uk/guidance/local-restriction-tiers-what-you-need-to-know
I think they mean yes as long as you wear face coverings and take care with other precautions.. You have to follow some of the links to dig deeper into the guidance to get all of the picture.
And note that being in tier 2 before lockdown doesn't necessarily mean that you will be in tier 2 after 2nd December. They've said they will tell us about that on Thursday.
Well I guess all we need now is to know how our local airfields, the BMAA and CAA react to it all. At first reading, it sounds like we should be OK flying together if we put on masks and thick foreign accents. That way, no one will know who we are.
 

Halibut

Student Pilot
#9
Well I guess all we need now is to know how our local airfields, the BMAA and CAA react to it all. At first reading, it sounds like we should be OK flying together if we put on masks and thick foreign accents. That way, no one will know who we are.
Our local (spam) club is planning to start instruction again on Thursday
 

BobH

Student Pilot
#11
My planes are SSDR, so I guess I won't need a facemask to prevent spreading germs to myself. That said, when flying the Spectrum I do wear a balaclava, which is like a facemask on steroids, inside my crash helmet and full face visor, but that's to stop my nose from getting frostbite. :LOL:
 

Halibut

Student Pilot
#12
I'm rather enjoying wearing a mask now. I've got such a big hooter, it actually makes me more attractive. Well, less unattractive.
 

BobH

Student Pilot
#13
Beware Halibut, wearing a mask rots your teeth! It also gives you bad breath because you're breathing back in all the nasty germs and other stuff you've just breathed out. This means you'll exacerbate any throat infections or other respirotary problems and you may find you get a bad taste in your mouth all the time. Not to mention a constant low level headache due to the lack of oxygen caused by the mask.

Anyway, getting back to your teeth, you won't notice it now, but in 2 years time you may find you need a trip to the dentist for new fillings. That's because whatever happens to you now is reflected in your tooth health 2 years later.
 

ginge

First Solo Pilot
#14
I once made the mistake of dashing out without having my shave. Apart from iritating my face I found that as I talked my mask was slowly ratcheted down and I kept having to hitch it up. Annoying things but better than spreading the evil bug around.
 

Halibut

Student Pilot
#15
Beware Halibut, wearing a mask rots your teeth! It also gives you bad breath because you're breathing back in all the nasty germs and other stuff you've just breathed out. This means you'll exacerbate any throat infections or other respirotary problems and you may find you get a bad taste in your mouth all the time. Not to mention a constant low level headache due to the lack of oxygen caused by the mask.

Anyway, getting back to your teeth, you won't notice it now, but in 2 years time you may find you need a trip to the dentist for new fillings. That's because whatever happens to you now is reflected in your tooth health 2 years later.
Except, of course, if I wear a mask...nobody will be able to see my rotting teeth!
 

Mike Calvert

Moderator
Staff member
#17
Wearing a mask absolutely does NOT reduce oxygen - god knows where that nonsense originated, but it is patently untrue. Just ask anyone in the health service where they're wearing them all day!
 

BobH

Student Pilot
#18
Mike, I think it depends on the mask. I've got a paint spraying mask that I can wear all day and breathe comfortably in, but the cheap blue/white masks I see people wearing in the street are not the same thing at all. I've got one that I find I can't breathe in, so I pull it down a bit and breathe through my uncovered nose to overcome the problem.

I saw some video the other day of a boy standing up wearing a face mask, while the boy's father put some kind of monitor tube inside the mask from under the boy's chin. He then read off the CO2 level on a measuring device. After several breaths the boy wearing the mask had a reading of over 5,000 parts of CO2 per million in the mask, when the normal level is around 400 parts.

Here's a link to the video I saw.

So the CO2 level is much elevated within the mask. As Mr Bigtree points out in his video, this will inhibit the amount of oxygen breathed in as a much larger amount of CO2 is breathed back in per breath, along with all the other crap the wearer has just breathed out.
 

Halibut

Student Pilot
#19
Interesting. One of my boys used to use a resistance mask when he was a rower. It cut the amount of air he could take in. The theory was that it would make your lungs more efficient/bigger/whatever. He didn't wear it when he was actually rowing but when he was cycling (sometimes, when he was running, he also simultaneously used a resistance chute). Perhaps these face coverings might have a similar beneficial effect
 
#20
Mustn't forget that it's not hypoxia that you notice, its high carbon dioxide levels. It's quite possible the blood oxygen levels are fine*.
Of course exposing the nose defeats the object of wearing the face covering.

*NB. not a medic.
 

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